Russia’s state nuclear agency launches unit to develop lithium batteries

Russia’s state nuclear agency launches unit to develop lithium batteries

Russia’s state nuclear agency launches unit to develop lithium batteries 150 150 Energy Storage Journal

October 15, 2020: Russia’s State Atomic Energy Corporation Rosatom has launched an energy storage business unit, RENERA, to develop lithium-ion batteries for EVs and emergency power supply, renewable energy and load smoothing, the company said on October 8.

RENERA was formed from Rosatom’s TVEL Fuel Company, when it was called Cathode Materials LLC. The agency’s press statement says it already has 120 projects in its portfolio for the supply of lithium-ion storage devices.

“A number of contracts have been implemented for modernization of logistics electric vehicles, as well as equipping substation DC systems and uninterrupted power supply systems with lithium-ion storage devices,” the statement says.

“Module type lithium-ion traction batteries are widely in demand in the electric vehicle market and are one of the most cost-efficient and technologically advanced solutions for intralogistics.”

The move is a rare sign that Russia is looking to change its energy policy, according to the June 2020 Implications of the Global Energy Transition on Russia report.

The report was co-authored by James Henderson, a director of the Natural Gas Programme at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies and Tatiana Mitorva from the Energy Center at the Moscow School of Management.

“Russia, which ranks fourth in the world in terms of primary energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions, is adhering to a strategy of ‘business as usual’ and continues to rely on fossil fuels”, the report says.

“The share of solar and wind energy in the Russian energy balance is insignificant and, according to official forecasts, it is not expected to exceed 1% by 2035.

“The challenge for Russia in the coming years is to develop a new strategy for energy sector development (at least for energy exports), even in the absence of a significant domestic climate change agenda, in the face of increasing global competition, growing technological isolation and financial constraints.”